Podcast

Conservative Casual Friday (Now Wednesday)—Statistician to the Stars Debunks Coronadoom

Two great radio shows, featuring not-so-great Yours Truly.

Andrew Harrod of Global Patriot Radio kindly interviewed me last Friday on his show, Conservative Casual Friday–Statistician to the Stars Debunks Coronadoom, which you, being the blessed soul that you are, can now listen to.

Andrew E. Harrod is a freelance researcher and writer who holds a PhD from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy and a JD from George Washington University Law School. He is admitted to the Virginia State Bar. He has published hundreds of articles concerning various political and religious topics at the American Spectator, American Thinker, the Blaze, Breitbart, Capital Research Center, Daily Caller, Daily Wire, FrontPage Magazine, Institute on Religion and Democracy, Independent Journal Review, Investigative Project on Terrorism, Jihad Watch, Mercatornet, National Interest, Washington Times, and World, among others. He is a fellow with the Lawfare Project, an organization combating the misuse of human rights law against Western societies. He is a Middle East Forum Campus Watch Fellow. He can be followed on twitter @AEHarrod.

Then we have Ed Bonderenka of Your American Heritage. He invited me on his WAAM 1600 AM radio show last Saturday.

Ed Bonderenka is the host of Your American Heritage. The show’s mission is to examine current events in the light of our past, our Founding and Biblical Principles.

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Categories: Podcast

15 replies »

  1. Sadly, I read, not listen to radio shows. Perhaps tomorrow will be worth checking out.

    (Interesting that people cannot/do not read much anymore…..Wonder why people insist on writing books and not just selling podcasts and radio shows?)

  2. I’m in the middle of the first interview. Great so far! Though the swine flu point is wrong. Either by global or US numbers, Covid-19 appears to be the bigger killer.

  3. Xens,

    Hope I didn’t say it was worse, but that it was similar. Asian flu and Hong Kong kung fluey were worse.

  4. ABS wishes Miss Chris Wallace had Briggs on to interview about coronadoom especially about new “cases.”

    Briggs’ responses would cause Miss Chris to curl up on the floor sucking his thumb.

    Because the media is comprised of low information activist retards (LIARs) who are post-christian commies it can’t be dismissed that their fear of dying from this virus is one way for them to think that they are part of a generation that will be forever remembered.

    Because they are no longer believers death by a named virus is their only path to immortality

  5. Basics considerations re mortality rates and impacts on populations:

    Why do casual observers/media get easily fooled in early stages of higher than ACTUAL fatality rate:

    https://youtu.be/3BdPKpWbxTg

    From 7:00
    Spanish flue has and infection fatality rate of 3%
    Estimated fatality rate ‘falls” over time as understanding improves and more subclinical cases are identified.

    Swine flu wasn’t that bad, I had it while working in Colchester’s Oaks.
    There was a thing called tamiflu, (my spelling), an antiviral, which is not effective for covid.

    If you are in your eighties and catch covid you have a very good chance of being fine.
    That is not said enough, to reassure people.

  6. Joy : If you are in your eighties and catch covid you have a very good chance of being fine.
    That is not said enough, to reassure people.
    … Even eighties mostly need the comorbidities

    My neighbor was (almost?) crying for two days from the body aches.
    His wife still (a month or more later?) has little sense of smell and taste

    As for the vaccine that comes up (flu or Covid), the most interested consumers are health care workers

    I WAS going to bring up world deaths from yearly flu at 650,000. If you subtract the “excess (of/over flu)” Covid deaths in developed countries from the World deaths total, the World seems to be rather well off unless the World has unreported or under reported deaths … if that makes sense

  7. I’m thinking we might’ve turned the corner on the second “wave”

    Looking at individual states in WorldOMeters, and using “new cases” as a proxy…
    And looking at death data

    These states remain problematical (i.e., no visible peak):
    Virginia
    Tennessee
    Ohio
    Nevada
    Mississippi
    Georgia
    Arkansas (barely)

    Previous Problem States that may have turned the corner (but populations leave them almost on a par with Problem states above)
    Texas
    North Carolina
    Louisiana
    Florida
    Arizona

    These states appear to have turned a corner, but the jury is still out:
    California
    Alabama

  8. Possibly, people have become more risk averse over the decades, causing them to respond differently relative to past pandemics. Flue is a little different from covid-19 as there is less uncertainty associated with the effect.

  9. Peter,
    Yes, and there is also herd immunity.

    The epidemic ‘waves’, if they follow expectations, should reduce as long as people find out more about how to behave. It is behaviourally spread. As the truth comes out and more is known, people’s responses are more in line with what is necessary to reduce spread.

    John B ()
    That’s a euphemistic/diplomatic? way of describing the vaccine situation.
    Politically correct, I should say, given the audience.

    If medical care staff spread or catch disease it is game over for everybody else.
    Hospitals always stipulate via occupational health assessment that staff must be vaccinated appropriately. Nobody is mad enough to refuse.That is, however a prerequisite of the work.

    Just like driving, you need a licence.

    If you don’t look after yourself you can’t look after other people.
    Hospitals look after their staff.

    One constant correlation I’ve noted from the US and UK figures as, since very early on, March, or so. The UK remains remarkably in step by ration with the US for number of deaths.

    Roughly three and a half times whatever the UK has.
    I keep expecting that pattern to break but it hasn’t yet.

    That’s another reason I think the US has not done as badly as is claimed. What is important is whether or not intervention helps. Not who had the worst luck.

    Regarding world figures I don’t think it’s a useful number at all. Too much inaccuracy for comparison and poor reporting of data. Still not convinced it tells anybody anything useful.

    One reason our medical officers were only presenting hospital data was because they wanted to measure accurately, to get an idea of the progress of the pandemic. It is the most consistent and reliable data stream. The media inquisitors went on and on about it as if it was covering up deaths. No amount of explanation was good enough. THOSE are the ones on the alarmist side.

    Dr Chris whitty said it is extremely easy to be facile about this epidemic. Commentary in the press has been just that. Take up by their consumers is important for cash flow.

  10. Remember, allow no vaccine to be given to you that was developed by using anything from the unborn boys and girls whether still in utero or not
    God bless, C-Marie

  11. Worldwide may actually have turned corner
    Maybe Briggs show

    USA Corner definitely turned:

    These states remain problematical (i.e., no visible peak):
    Washington – May have confused Washington with Virginia
    Tennessee
    Ohio
    Nevada
    North Carolina – mistakenly put on the turned corner
    Arkansas (barely)

    Previous Problem States that may have turned the corner (but populations leave them almost on a par with Problem states above)
    Texas
    Louisiana
    Florida
    Arizona

    These states appear to have turned a corner, but the jury is still out:
    California
    Alabama
    Mississippi
    Georgia
    Virginia

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